Fear over port plans in Melbourne’s west

AN increase in freight train traffic through residential areas could create noise problems and long waits at level crossings in Hobsons Bay if a planned ...

Another port in the storm: The real reason for the East West Link

Independent Australia: Another port in the storm: The real reason for the East West Link. Dr Matthew Mitchell. 27 November 2014

With Victoria going to the polls on Saturday, Jenny Warfe and Dr Matthew Mitchell present compelling evidence the real reason for the East West Link is not road congestion but a superfluous new port project.

Victorian Premier Denis Napthine’s figurehead multi-billion dollar road project, Melbourne’s East West Link, does not make financial sense — at least, not in the way it is being presented to the public. (More in link)

Project affecting all of Victoria has to be part of election debate

The Conversation: Project affecting all of Victoria has to be part of election debate. 4 November 2014. Peter van Duyn, Maritime Industry Expert, Institute for Supply Chain and Logistics at Victoria University and  Hermione Parsons Director, Institute for Supply Chain and Logistics at Victoria University

Victoria’s capacity to handle the millions of containers imported and exported through its ports affects the whole state. AAP/Julian Smith

Victoria’s election debate about infrastructure is shaping up around large projects such as the East West Link and Airport Rail Link. But another infrastructure project could also be on the radar: the choice of location for Victoria’s next container port.

The Coalition government favours Western Port. The Labor opposition favours the western part of Port Phillip Bay.

The revival of Sir Henry Bolte’s vision for developing the Port of Hastings, situated in Western Port, follows generations of politicians and successive Victorian governments maintaining the dream partly in response to the ongoing pressure to “do something” for regional Victoria (in particular Gippsland). Major infrastructure is tangible evidence of action that offers a proud legacy to all involved in its planning, development and implementation.

Planning for an alternative to the Port of Melbourne has gained momentum in recent years. This is due to the substantial growth in the size of international container vessels – between 1988 and 2014, vessels have grown from 4000 to 18,000 containers – and the decision by Maersk Line to build a fleet of mega-ships, which require a deep-water port. Continue Reading…

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