How to Stop a Highway

Interesting timing with US Department of Transportation releasing this handy toolkit about how to influence and/or stop bad infrastructure projects.

The Department of Transportation releases a plain-language toolkit to help citizens weigh in on all kinds of projects—so they can thwart the bad ones

CityLab: How to Stop a Highway (13 December 2016)

The Department of Transportation releases a plain-language toolkit to help citizens weigh in on all kinds of projects—so they can thwart the bad ones.

So, let’s say your state department of transportation wants to widen the highway in your neighborhood. It’s a horrendous idea—more noise, more pollution, and a bigger tear through city streets.

But how do you tell them so? The project’s draft analysis is thousands of pages long, full of technical verbiage you’d need degrees to understand. The public forums are cage fights between cranky neighbors and engineers with jargon-studded retorts for every possible complaint. Besides, what’s the point? The highway’s coming, whether you pipe up or not. That’s what always happens. Right?

Continue Reading…

Melbourne faces death by gridlock, even with billions spent on new roads

The Age: Melbourne faces death by gridlock, even with billions spent on new roads Josh Gordon (25 November 2016)

Melbourne commuting times and costs, 2016, Photo: Infrastructure Victoria

Melbourne commuting times and costs, 2016, Photo: Infrastructure Victoria

Melbourne is set to become so choked by cars in coming decades that the average speed during the morning peak will drop to just 31 kilometres an hour – even with billions of dollars of planned road and rail upgrades.

In a depressing analysis of the challenges facing Australia’s fastest growing city, Infrastructure Victoria bluntly warns it will be impossible for Melbourne to build its way out of congestion.

Ramping up the case for a new regime of road pricing to better manage demand by replacing the inefficient and unfair melange of charges faced by motorists – including fuel excise, rego fees, licence fees, stamp duty, tolls and parking fees – the infrastructure adviser warns frustrations for drivers and public transport users will only grow. Continue Reading…

Homeless miss out as EVO flats acquired because of East West Link go on sale

Get that EVO feeling!

Get that EVO feeling!

Want to buy a luxury apartment with a chequered past and an uncertain future?

Pssstttt … those EVO Apartments in Parkville, across the road from Ross Straw Field, are up for sale. So much for this continuing shell game that the state government is playing via media releases, over dealing with Victoria’s homeless issues.

The Age: Homeless miss out as EVO flats acquired because of East West Link go on sale. Benjamin Preiss

Parkville’s EVO apartments, sold off the plan as offering a luxury lifestyle with views, were all acquired by the state government after it was revealed that the tower would be surrounded by roads as part of the East West Link.

When Daniel Andrews scrapped that controversial road plan, the government suggested the tower could be used to accommodate the homeless.

But that is not to be. The EVO apartments will soon be sold on the private market. Continue Reading…

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