Victorian public has strong doubts about east-west link

Twelve months before the next state election, an Age/Nielsen poll of 1000 voters reveals just 23 per cent believe building the east-west link road tunnel is a bigger priority than improving public transport, which is the option favoured by 74 per cent of respondents.

Victorian public has strong doubts about east-west link.  Adam Carey, The Age, November 28, 2013

Just one in four Victorians believe the Napthine government’s signature project, the east-west link, is more important than improving public transport.

Twelve months before the next state election, an Age/Nielsen poll of 1000 voters reveals just 23 per cent believe building the east-west link road tunnel is a bigger priority than improving public transport, which is the option favoured by 74 per cent of respondents.

The poll result will pile further pressure on the Coalition, which is struggling to communicate its policy agenda above the chaos of State Parliament. The 5.2-kilometre east-west link between the Eastern Freeway and CityLink is the biggest project the Napthine government has undertaken. It argues the link is essential to prevent Melbourne being crippled by congestion, and will reduce peak-hour traffic by up to 30 per cent on many notoriously clogged arterial roads. It also argues the road will improve tram travel in the inner north, because five tram routes that intersect with Alexandra Parade will get a better run.

The road has been endorsed by powerful lobbying voices including the construction unions, the RACV and business group the Victorian Employers’ Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

Yet, the wider public evidently remains sceptical of the east-west link’s benefits. This poll’s clear, stated preference for better public transport over a single major road project is a demographic puzzle that threatens to trip up the government in its first term. Continue Reading…

RACV ELECTIONS SCORECARD: MAKE THIS A REFERENDUM ON THE EAST WEST LINK! MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT!

RACV-scorecard4

As you are aware the RACV, a supporter of the State government’s East West link, is currently holding elections for a new board.  Traditionally only 60,000 of their 1.4 million members vote so this represents a real opportunity to “turn this years’ board election into a referendum on East West Link” (Trent McCarthy).

We encourage all public transport advocates who are also RACV members to vote in this election – the above scorecard indicates that at least three candidates oppose the East West Link.

Ballots are being distributed with this months RACV magazine – remember to vote in this election – your vote can make a difference.

The scorecard was prepared by Yarra Climate Action Now (Ycan) in consultion with Ycat for Coalition of Transport Action Groups (CTAG).

Questions were addressed directly to candidates and the card indicates the candidates’ responses and attitudes to the East-West road tunnel.

To view the card go to: http://racvscorecard.com

Additional information

freda (Ycat)

The east-west smog factory should never be built

Why does the RACV support this folly?
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From  Brendan Gleeson, professor of urban policy studies and director of the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute at Melbourne University.

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The east-west road link, if built, will be a planning disaster for Melbourne. It fails most major planning tests and flies in the face of overwhelming urban science that shows we can never build our way out of congestion.<

An international urban consensus now regards massive road building as massive folly: not on moral grounds, but because it simply doesn’t work.

And the east-west link scorns the urgent need to decarbonise our cities in the face of a species emergency, global warming. Other cities and nations will judge us severely for building this smog factory in a time of planetary crisis.

The link’s damage will extend far beyond Melbourne. It will harm the entire state by reducing resources for public investment for many years. The first stage will cost at least $6 billion. The full project cost will be much more. Continue Reading…

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